Internet highlights – w/c 19th January 2020

25 01 2020

People lacking common sense.

Stupid pages doctors have received.

A musical analysis of The Simpsons theme tune.

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Northanger Abbey – by Jane Austen

24 01 2020

Before this I’d read two of Austen’s books, but for a long time hadn’t read anymore. But it’s a new year, and I thought I’d give it a go again – picked a shortish one so it was more manageable, and it turned out it was way more readable than I remembered!

I’ve watched the ITV adaptation several times so I had a good idea of the plot, but didn’t remember it being funny! For example, from the very first page: “Her father was a clergyman, without being neglected, or poor, and a very respectable man, though his name was Richard – and he had never been handsome.”

This is the story of Catherine Morland, who is taken by family friends to Bath and while there meets both the Tilneys and the Thorpes. The first half of the book focuses on the friendships with these, while the second half takes her to Northanger Abbey as a guest of the Tilneys. Catherine has read a lot of Gothic Horror novels and has something of an overactive imagination, which in that environment gets her in a bit of trouble!

I like how Austen on a few occasions in the book takes a breath and talks to the reader; at one point saying how she isn’t going to do something that most novel writers do, at another referring as to how few pages are left and so obviously we’re near the happy ending, and ending with a question for the reader of: “I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.”

It’s an Austen novel, so you know there’s going to be class, romance, drama, and a happy ending, but it was a good read, I really enjoyed it – the idea of picking up another Austen is less scary now!





Internet highlights – w/c 12th January 2020

18 01 2020

Friends facts.

Contrasting the tabloids’ treatment of Kate with their treatment of Meghan.

A joke, misunderstood.

Misused quotation marks.

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The Infographic Bible – by Karen Sawrey

14 01 2020

Who doesn’t love a good infographic? And a whole A4 hardback book of them – lovely! The book works its way through the Bible from beginning to end, but with interludes for some that cross the whole book.

The font is very small in some places, I had to decent lamp if I was reading it in the evenings, and sit by a window in daytime, but I guess it was that, remove some of the information or release an A3 book, so I think this was the best option! But definitely remember your glasses!

I read the book from cover to cover, but you could easily just pick it up and open a random page. Definitely was more interested in some than others, I found when some were really text heavy I’d just read headers and take the gist, but all of them were so brilliantly presented and easy to understand.

They’re good at quoting sources at the bottom of each page, and there are always keys to help you follow what’s being shown to you. Also, I don’t know if it was intentional or not, but when it went from Old Testament to New Testament, the pages went from matt to gloss!

If you’re into infographics and the Bible, there’s not much to dislike about this!





Internet highlights – w/c 5th January 2020

11 01 2020

Lots of stories of Tom Hanks just being a wonderful human being.

Things Britain does better than the USA.

Disney princesses re-imagined as potatoes.

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Internet highlights – w/c 29th December 2019

4 01 2020

Cheapest pint near each tube station.

Further examples of two nations separated by a common language.

Don’t accuse someone of photoshopping when you don’t understand physics.

“On the spectrum” doesn’t mean what we think.

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