Internet highlights – w/c 22nd March 2020

28 03 2020

Upstairs. Neighbours.

Ideas of things to clean and how to clean them if you’ve got time to kill!

If Friends was set in the UK.

Album covers redone to be social distancing appropriate.

Things that would have been weird a month ago.

The National Theatre are going to stream one free play per week.

Church hunting in 2020.

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The Rosie Result – by Graeme Simsion

28 03 2020

This is the final book in this ‘Rosie’ trilogy about Don Tillman.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Don is just a really likeable character (possibly moreso because the books are written in the first person from his perspective). By this book he and Rosie have been married for over a decade and have a 10 year old son, Hudson. Don has a lot of things he’s learned about social interaction, rules and patterns to keep an eye out for to understand things he might otherwise struggle with.

Early in the book there’s a suggestion from the school that Hudson may be autistic and that they should look into having him tested. Don is not keen on this, but the comment has also been made about him. He leaves his job to focus on Hudson, to try and achieve various targets (numbered, of course) to help him to fit in.

A lot of the book questions autism stereotypes, as well as educating neurotypicals in ways they can better help those with autism feel comfortable – one being checking if their preference is to be referred to as ‘autistic’ or ‘person with autism’! There’s definitely a message in the book about how we always think of ‘unable to feel empathy’ as a symptom of autism, but rarely do neurotypical people have much empathy for them – definitely a few challenges thrown in, which is helpful.

I’ve made this sound like a heavy book, it’s not. It’s funny, warm, and interesting! There’s also a whole plot with Don opening a bar given his interest and skill in cocktail making – it’s an easy read, just has a good message to share along with it.





Internet highlights – w/c 15th March 2020

21 03 2020

It’s a long and weird week, there’s been a lot of time on the internet and a lot of stuff on the internet, so sorry if this is a bit long! Obviously there’s a lot linked to Coronavirus, but I’ve tried to make sure the majority is humorous, or good advice, rather than miserable or stressful, though the occasional may have slipped in, sorry. Now you see why I do this consolidating in one place, rather than sharing and retweeting all this as the week goes!


Tips for working from home.

Call to day of prayer and action on Sunday 22nd.

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Twas the nightshift before Christmas – by Adam Kay

15 03 2020

“This is Going to Hurt” has been an absolute sensation and after reading it in 2018, when I saw that a short (142 pages) Christmas follow-up was coming out I was very excited to read it. I got it for my dad for Christmas as his career was in the NHS and he’d also loved the first one, and I’ve now borrowed it back from him! (Thanks Dad!)

There isn’t much to add to what I said about the first book (if you haven’t read that, I would read that first, just for a bit more context), it’s just a great insight into the reality of life in the NHS, a few highs – mainly lows of course, but told in a humour that means it’s an entertaining read.

My favourite thing about this was a footnote in the introduction:

“In mt first book, “This is Going to Hurt”, the most common reasons for entries being omitted included ‘too disgusting’ or ‘too Christmassy’. Here I make amends for both.”

If that doesn’t make you want to read it – nothing will!





Internet highlights – w/c 8th March 2020

14 03 2020

The internet roasts Disney films.

Films that should be made from other character’s perspectives.

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Noughts & Crosses – by Malorie Blackman

8 03 2020

I remember this book coming out when I was a teenager, I remember loads of people reading it, but I never heard what it was about and never got around to reading it myself. With the coming of the new series from the BBC, I thought I’d finally give it a go, so got myself a copy off eBay and flew through it!

The basic premise is a divided society, where black people (Crosses) have all the power, and white people (noughts) are the downtrodden and oppressed in society. Callum is a nought teenage boy and Sephy is a Cross teenage girl. When they were kids, Callum’s mum worked at Sephy’s house and so they were friends, but as he is one of the first noughts allowed into a Cross school, their friendship is tested. Things progress from there as a group of noughts are trying to form an uprising. It’s a little bit Romeo and Juliet in its nature.

The chapters are narrated alternating between Callum and Sephy, and the book itself covers a few years, so things change a lot, but it’s told really well and keeps you extremely gripped. Technically it won an award for children’s fiction, but it’s definitely not suitable for young children, and the new BBC series based on it is airing at 9pm – there’s plenty of darkness in it!

I’m watching the first episode of the TV series as I write this, so won’t comment on that here other than to say it seems quite different so far!





Internet highlights – w/c 1st March 2020

7 03 2020

Lots of heart warming things 🙂 .

Questions from childhood films.

Contrasting HIMYM with Friends – who did what better?

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