How to be a Woman – by Caitlin Moran

16 09 2018

I’ve always enjoyed following Caitlin Moran on Twitter so I picked this up in a charity shop to try out. Essentially it’s her autobiography from puberty onwards, crossed with a book about Feminism.

She writes in a way that’s very easy to read, she’s fun and chatty, though some of her descriptions of puberty got a little graphic in places!

That said, I really disagree with a good chunk of what she’s trying to say – I’m not anti-feminist as such, but on specific topics like abortion and porn, I definitely disagreed.

I’m not looking to start a whole debate on here, but just to pick up on one point – in her chapter on abortion she says the following:

“I cannot understand anti-abortion arguments that centre on the sanctity of life. As a species, we’ve fairly comprehensively demonstrated that we don’t believe in the sanctity of life. The shrugging acceptance of war, famine, epidemic, pain and life-long grinding poverty show us that, whatever we tell ourselves, we’ve made only the most feeble of efforts to really treat human life as sacred.”

That just makes no sense to me – yes we don’t deal with some of those things as we should, but we agree that they’re wrong and bad. They’re all things I’m against, this argument doesn’t line up at all.

Definitely an interesting read to get you thinking, but not one that has earned a permanent spot on my bookshelf.

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Internet highlights – w/c 9th September 2018

15 09 2018

Ingenious nicknames (2 pages).

Would You Rather with carbs.

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Internet highlights – w/c 2nd September 2018

8 09 2018

Peeled things.

Brilliant packaging.

Badly designed things.

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Internet highlights – w/c 26th August 2018

1 09 2018

Jobs they don’t tell you about at school.

Peoples funny little habits.

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The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass (aged 37 3/4) – by Adrian Plass

1 09 2018

I’ve been an Adrian Plass fan for a long time, so to have not read possibly his most famous book, seemed ridiculous!

This book is so much fun, I laughed out loud so many times, but it has points to make too. It’s essentially a fictional diary which pokes fun at the things we do in church that are just a little bit odd, while maintaining respect for the things that are important.

I’d recommend this book to every Christian out there for when you need some light relief – at only 156 pages, it’s a very quick and easy read!





Internet highlights – w/c 19th August 2018

25 08 2018

About the plastic straw ban.

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The Book Thief – by Markus Zusak

22 08 2018

I nearly gave up on this during the first 100 pages, but it was so worth persevering!

The narrator of the book is Death, and that’s what made the beginning so strange, I got into it once it settled into a more normal narrative, with Death’s thoughts and opinions just popping up from time to time.

We’re in Germany during WW2, Liesel arrives at the home of her new foster parents who are in one of the poorest areas of town, she spends her time helping her Mama collect and deliver laundry, and playing (and a bit of stealing) with Rudy from next door. She’s known as The Book Thief because that’s what she does. For example, at one point there’s a Nazi rally in town, and a bonfire of all sorts of propaganda, but she realises the books at the bottom aren’t burning, so she sneaks in and takes one. At the start, she can’t read, and so with these books and help from her Papa, she learns, but it’s a habit she continues!

I won’t go any further as I don’t want to give spoilers but as I say, once it settled down I really enjoyed it and would definitely recommend it!