And Then There Were None – by Agatha Christie

23 02 2021

I recently read the following quote from Val McDermid: “Agatha Christie is the gateway drug to crime fiction”, and am finding this more and more so to be true! Having read Murder on the Orient Express last summer, I asked for another for Christmas – my brother got me this and it was excellent!

I don’t know if this true of all of her books, but in the two I’ve read, they’ve started by introducing a whole load of unrelated characters, and then starting to tell the story, this means they can take a while to get to grips with, but in this one I kept a couple of post-its in pages with info that was helpful to flick back to frequently, eg the character intros, why each of them had journeyed to this tiny island, and the rhyme that gives the structure of the story, “Ten little soldier boys” (although it’s had other names in the past, which have also been the title of the book, but have since been deemed less than PC).

But fairly soon, all of them were familiar, and I was hooked! I kept grabbing it to see who was going to be killed off next (it brings out a very dark side!) and if the people I thought might be responsible really were – completely addictive.

I will certainly be asking for another for my birthday!





Internet highlights – w/c 14th February 2021

20 02 2021

Chocolate bars that have shrunk and grown over the years.
Things that are dirtier than we realise.
Plot holes that aren’t plot holes.
People showing their stupidity on the internet.
Pancake art.
Great outfits from Monica, Rachel & Phoebe.
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Internet highlights – w/c 7th February 2021

13 02 2021

Problems colour-blind people have.
Changes in the Harry Potter films from the books.
Things to give up for lent in 2021.


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Dave Gorman vs The Rest Of The World – by Dave Gorman

11 02 2021

When I was putting together my Christmas list (I can hardly say “writing” my Christmas list when I was pulling links together!) I thought how there was only one Dave Gorman book I hadn’t read, and so it was about time I did!

It’s a very simple concept, one day Dave Gorman put a tweet out into the universe asking if anyone wanted to play a game (real life games, not video games). He got replies, and went to play games with those people! There’s a bit in the middle of the book where someone wants to work with him on this “project”, (he definitely has previous with “Googlewhack Adventure”, “Are you Dave Gorman”, and “America Unchained”) but he says no, it’s no project, just something he’s doing for fun in his time off…. He doesn’t explain how he got from there to publishing it in a book!

The games range from Ultimate Frisbee to an Egyptian laser chess game to Cluedo to a random Cornish skittles game. The book is just him talking about the experience, the places he went, the people he met, the games he played. And just with his eye for detail (enjoying the simplicity of Cribbage having 2 pegs for scoring so you never lose your place), and his gentle chatter, it’s a lovely book to read. He met some lovely people, and some complete weirdos (including people who play Monopoly with REAL money), both of which made for fun reading!

For most of the book he keeps a scoreboard of him vs the rest of the world, though it does seem to go missing for some of the middle of the book (And I’m not sure there was a final total)! And for the less common games he puts an explanation in a handy box so we know what’s going on. As a fan of structure, this was pretty pleasing.

As ever, some of my favourite quotes and observations from the book (the last one is the most beautiful):

  • “There’s something oddly energising about sparking a memory from nowhere like that. I don’t think it’s the memory itself that does it. I think it’s the excitement at discovering your brain is so much bigger than you realised.”
  • “At Stockport bus depot I stood and waited. There were maybe fifteen fellow travellers at the same bus stand, all eyeing each other up carefully. No queue had been formed but we’d all made a mental note of the order in which we’d arrived.”
  • “There’s an unhealthy part of my personality that tends to obsess and collect; that will take things to extremes. I can be a dog with a bone at times. But I didn’t want to let it happen again. Not with this. It wasn’t a treasure hunt. There wasn’t a prize for playing the most games in the shortest amount of time.”
  • “I feel naked if I’m not wearing a watch and yet, when I want to know the time, I sometimes find myself checking my phone first.”
  • “There are no referees in Ultimate. Ever. At any level. Messing around in the park? No ref. Playing a rival club? No ref. World Championship final? No ref. Players call their own fouls and have to settle their own disputes. If you’re going to play Ultimate, you just have to accept that paying the game fairly is more important than winning.”
  • “I would’nt describe Liskeard as a pretty place. It’s more prosaic than that. If you think of all the little villages around and about as gorgeous old vintage sports cars – high maintenance, impractical, but lovely for looking at – then Liskeard is the rusty but trusty family saloon. And while those vintage automobiles are all very well, when you want to do the shopping you know which car keys you pick up. (If you want to stick with this motoring analogy, it follows that Plymouth is, um … a transit van.”
  • “I have grown snobbish about the world world of ‘organised fun’. I suspect I’m not alone. Holiday camps? Karaoke? Guided coach trips? […] I instinctively recoil from such things but I don’t know why, because all empirical evidence suggests I’ll enjoy them.”
  • “When we throw our cynicism aside there’s so much more to enjoy.”





Internet highlights – w/c 31st January 2021

6 02 2021

Annoying film cliches.
Did Regina George just not understand what Lebanese meant?

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Internet highlights – w/c 24th January 2021

30 01 2021

Inconsistent timelines in TV shows and films.
Bond film delays causing product placement havoc.


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Internet highlights – w/c 17th January 2021

23 01 2021

Stupid things from the Trump era.
Outakes from Friends, The Office US, and Parks & Rec.

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Dear NHS 100 Stories to Say Thank You – Edited by Adam Kay

19 01 2021

Last year during lockdown Adam Kay (of “This is Going to Hurt” fame) reached out to some of the nations best loved stars to ask them to contribute to this book. There are tales from all sorts of people, from Dawn French to Malala to Paul McCartney and obviously many many others (I’ll stick a photo of the back cover which lists them all at the bottom of this post).

It’s a compilation of over 100 stories of gratitude. Some will make you laugh (Lee Mack and Greg Wise come to mind immediately!) and others will make you cry, but they all just make you appreciate how lucky we are to have the NHS (and the people that work for it!) in this country. It’s a beautiful book, and so moving to read while we’re back in lockdown again. Well Done Dr Kay.





Internet highlights – w/c 10th January 2021

16 01 2021


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Internet highlights – w/c 3rd January 2021

9 01 2021

Window Swap.
Things that seem romantic in films, but would be creepy in real life.


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