Anne of Ingleside – by L M Montgomery

20 01 2019

After two years, I’ve finally finished the main part of this series of books! There are two more that follow, but their focus is on the children, no more “Anne of….”, so I sort of consider this a job done!

That said, even thought this is an “Anne of” book, the focus really is on the children – Anne and Gilbert have six children including a set of twins, all with their different escapades, and not a huge amount of time spent on Anne other than when the children take their problems to her to solve. For the most of the book, Anne has become a flawless woman with her days of escapades and learning about herself long gone – but there is a really nice moment near the end where we find she’s not perfect after all, and she struggles with something so completely relatable to us all, it’s nice to see she’s still got a realistic side to her.

Still very enjoyable, warm and fuzzy, and an easy read.

As with the previous books, this one still has some lovely one liners – here are a few of my favourites:

  • “‘Praying’s good. I lost a dime once and I prayed and I found a quarter. That’s how I know.'”
  • “‘Hasn’t the world got its face washed nice and clean?’ cried Di, on the morning sunshine returned.”
  • “‘God doesn’t make bargains, He gives… gives without asking from us in return, except love.'”
  • “‘If a minister preaches a sermon that hits home to some particular individual people always suppose he meant it for that very person,’ said Anne. ‘A hand=me-down cap is bound to fit somebody’s head, but it doesn’t follow that it was made for him.'”
  • “‘David is going to be married at last,’ said Miss Cornelia. ‘He’s been a long time making up his mind which was cheaper, marrying or hiring.'”
  • “‘The same summer will never be coming twice'”
  • “Anne knew quite well that this idea was absolutely unreasonable, but when was jealousy ever reasonable?”

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Internet highlights – w/c 13th January 2019

19 01 2019

Museums fought over who have the best ducks.

Historical facts that mess up the timeline in your head.

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Internet highlights – w/c 6th January 2019

12 01 2019

Exercise bike that does your laundry.

Different profession’s euphemisms for “I don’t have a clue”.

Great ideas from hotels.

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Internet highlights – w/c 30th December 2018

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Train companies raise fares bang on time.

All schools to teach CPR and basic first aid.

Teachers who got the last laugh.

Brilliantly designed things.

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Theologygrams – by Rich Wyld

30 12 2018

My brother got me this for Christmas. I generally don’t consider myself intelligent enough to read books on theology, but this is practically a picture book full of graphs and diagrams, and those I can do!

Some of them are serious, but many are a mixture of humour too – three involve Doctor Who and one involves Mr T, so it’s pretty lighthearted, but still got some interesting content – seeing Paul’s missionary journeys presented as a London tube map was inspired!





Internet highlights – w/c 23rd December 2018

29 12 2018

Tonnes of tiny details from the Harry Potter films.

If board games were named accurately.

Cats in Christmas trees.

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Going Solo – by Roald Dahl

29 12 2018

Having read the school years part of Roald Dahl’s autobiography, Boy, in September, I thought I’d try and finish the other half before the year was out!

This picks up where Boy left off, Roald heads out to work for Shell in what is now Tanzania. After a short while WW2 breaks out and after some work in that country, he goes to Nairobi to enlist in the RAF. From thereon in the book follows him through training, going into war, accidents, and all sorts, all the way through to his return to England.

I learnt so much about the war by reading this, I ignorantly never really knew what went on in Africa in the war, and it really hit home just how little chance of survival there was for those who were fighting. It really seems to me to be a miracle that he survived and that we have all these incredible books he wrote – at the point of war Roald was not an author at all, I’m guessing that comes later, and I’m so glad it did!