Uganda – LDP Seminars

10 11 2013

We spent three days on the trip with this years graduating class (123 students) of Leadership Development Program (LDP) Students. These are young men and women who have been sponsored as children, completed the program, excelled academically and shown leadership potential. These outstanding students are then sponsored through their university course (at a higher monthly rate of course!) while simultaneously studying on the leadership course, to become exceptional leaders within their professions. [Taken from my overview post]

On the Wednesday afternoon we had been asked to run seminars with the students, so after breakfast we got into groups to prepare. My group was doing “Finding a job and keeping a job”. Fortunately there were some bolder people than myself in my group, so I didn’t have to speak (fear of public speaking still as strong as ever!). Mid morning we headed across the city and were there by about lunchtime.

We sat in on the end of their morning session where they were talking about CVs and interviews. One of the questions that was asked was “Should you put your tribe on your CV?”. They discussed this for a while, how if you don’t have a surname you might use it, but if you might be judged for it, you can leave it off. It was just surprising to me as it’s the sort of thing that of course would never even come up in the UK! They also talked about skills in Access, Excel, about companies like PWC and Deloitte – for those few minutes you could have been back in the UK! Some of the careers advice was exactly what we learnt at school – don’t list weak hobbies, focus on your Higher Education and A and O Levels. For an interview you need to be knowledgeable about 4 things: yourself, the job, the organisation, and the market the organisation is working within. “Lack of information is the first source of lack of confidence.” If I was job hunting this is some of the best advice I could have got!

We broke for lunch and sat among the students, I sat with Carolyn & Tyler from Florida, and were joined by students Busco, Moses, Emmanuel and Sarah, it was lots of fun! Lunch was liver and rice (I was ridiculously proud of myself for willingly eating liver, but the other option was fish, and I was avoiding that all week!). After lunch there was a short worship time, but you could have been forgiven to think it was a party going on! Africans know how to worship with passion!

In our afternoon session we had 22 students in our group, I didn’t take notes or photos as it seemed rude, but I did scribble 2 things down:

  • On the way to work, pray: “How can I glorify You, and bless the people I work with today?” – even if it’s not where you want to be.
  • You can’t say “I can’t handle this”. You’re an adult, it’s your job to handle it.

Eighteen of the graduates were sponsored through the Compassion UK office, and I’d been asked, if possible, to get short video interviews with them. That afternoon I managed to find one of them, a young lady called Edith who was so full of joy and enthusiasm managed to fill 20minutes of video time while I started to panic about my bus leaving without me! She was amazing, she told me how she would like to be a Reverend, and then go on to be an MP! (not unrealistic!) It turned out later in the week that Edith was awarded as one of the ten “Outstanding” students in her class, and no wonder!

We stopped for dinner on the way back to the hotel at a place called Cafe Javas, which was fairly westernised, and the excitement when we found out they had a proper flushing toilet with a seat, well, we could hardly contain ourselves! Ironically I did try new food here, but it was Mexican food…! I had chicken and cheese Quesadilla – very nice!

By this point in the week I was already realising how we weren’t seeing the poverty in Uganda, but were seeing the happy stuff. The happy, joyful, well looked after children on the Tuesday, the smart, young professionals today. We were seeing the benefits of Compassion sponsorship.

But at the same time, I was being reminded that even in the nicest parts of the country, you’re still in Uganda. In our very nice, safe hotel that we stayed in (metal detectors at the entrance to grounds and buildings, and armed guards at the gates), my shower wasn’t really working beyond a dribble, and this was the morning that my tap ran yellow water – that’d be why you brush your teeth with bottled water only!

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3 12 2013
Uganda – Graduation | inekeclewer.wordpress.com

[…] awards for being “outstanding” – one of these was Edith, who I’d met on Wednesday, although her university graduation was on the same day, and so she wasn’t there. Another was […]

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